Aaron Pinto
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Tonight marks the end of an era: it’s the last ever episode of How I Met Your Mother. 
I started watching this series a few years back, after my brother continually nagged me to. To appease him, I binge watched entire seasons while on breaks from school. I’m glad he didn’t give up on getting me to watch— It didn’t take long for me to fall in love with it. Now I find myself in the position of nagging people to watch it, usually people who can’t wrap their head around the idea of a CBS comedy being funny.
And I get that— CBS is notorious for some of the worst sitcoms I’ve personally ever seen (The Big Bang Theory, Two and a Half Men, 2 Broke Girls). But it should be clear to any fan of comedy and good writing that How I Met Your Mother is different. To quote the AV Club article that’s been making the internet rounds today,

It’s Friends with single-camera elements; it’s Arrested Development that panders to the masses; it’s Seinfeld with a premise; it’s Lost with studio-audience laughter. 

Indeed. How I Met Your Mother is not a casual comedy— its complexities of plot, continuity, and character are overwhelming in the best way. Its blend of classic comedy with heart-wrenching sentimentality is unique and done better than any other show.
Whenever I defend That Thing You Do! as my favorite movie of all-time, I make the point that it has everything you want in a movie: first-rate comedy, great plot and storytelling, fun for everyone, romantic, sad, musically informed, full of life lessons. It’s safe to say that How I Met Your Mother is the television equivalent of that.
Sure, there have been some less-than-stellar episodes, plot turns, and writing decisions made with this show over the past 9 years. But those don’t take away from the series at large. At its best— even at its most average— How I Met Your Mother is a more fulfilling show than most and that’s on multiple levels, not the least of which being its comedic value.
I don’t think there will ever be another sitcom as great as How I Met Your Mother. For me, anyway. Ted, Robin, Barney, Marshall, and Lily will all be missed (as well as the mother [pictured]— we hardly knew ye!). As will all the side characters (Ranjit, Sandy Rivers, Patrice, Victoria, the parents, and so on). And the recurring bits (slap bet, yousonofabeetch, salutes, interventions, the red cowboy boots, and so on). But no one can take these things away from us— we’ll always have How I Met Your Mother, in all of its 208-episode awesomeness.

Tonight marks the end of an era: it’s the last ever episode of How I Met Your Mother

I started watching this series a few years back, after my brother continually nagged me to. To appease him, I binge watched entire seasons while on breaks from school. I’m glad he didn’t give up on getting me to watch— It didn’t take long for me to fall in love with it. Now I find myself in the position of nagging people to watch it, usually people who can’t wrap their head around the idea of a CBS comedy being funny.

And I get that— CBS is notorious for some of the worst sitcoms I’ve personally ever seen (The Big Bang TheoryTwo and a Half Men, 2 Broke Girls). But it should be clear to any fan of comedy and good writing that How I Met Your Mother is different. To quote the AV Club article that’s been making the internet rounds today,

It’s Friends with single-camera elements; it’s Arrested Development that panders to the masses; it’s Seinfeld with a premise; it’s Lost with studio-audience laughter. 

Indeed. How I Met Your Mother is not a casual comedy— its complexities of plot, continuity, and character are overwhelming in the best way. Its blend of classic comedy with heart-wrenching sentimentality is unique and done better than any other show.

Whenever I defend That Thing You Do! as my favorite movie of all-time, I make the point that it has everything you want in a movie: first-rate comedy, great plot and storytelling, fun for everyone, romantic, sad, musically informed, full of life lessons. It’s safe to say that How I Met Your Mother is the television equivalent of that.

Sure, there have been some less-than-stellar episodes, plot turns, and writing decisions made with this show over the past 9 years. But those don’t take away from the series at large. At its best— even at its most average— How I Met Your Mother is a more fulfilling show than most and that’s on multiple levels, not the least of which being its comedic value.

I don’t think there will ever be another sitcom as great as How I Met Your Mother. For me, anyway. Ted, Robin, Barney, Marshall, and Lily will all be missed (as well as the mother [pictured]— we hardly knew ye!). As will all the side characters (Ranjit, Sandy Rivers, Patrice, Victoria, the parents, and so on). And the recurring bits (slap bet, yousonofabeetch, salutes, interventions, the red cowboy boots, and so on). But no one can take these things away from us— we’ll always have How I Met Your Mother, in all of its 208-episode awesomeness.

(Source: atomic-dreamer)

# How I Met Your Mother# text# 2005-2014
Cool pic. Really one of my fav. bands.

Cool pic. Really one of my fav. bands.

(Source: facebook.com, via cretin-family)

# Ramones# photography# 1980
welzenis:

Jan Willem van Welzenis2013 Acrylic, oil pastel, paper on paper 30” x 22” / 76 x 56 cmView Post

Sign me up

welzenis:

Jan Willem van Welzenis

2013 
Acrylic, oil pastel, paper on paper 30” x 22” / 76 x 56 cm

View Post

Sign me up

# jan willem van welzenis# art# abstract expressionism
justinpeterson:

INKtober day 20! My theme: drawing the covers of my favorite records… today, a power-pop masterpiece:
Superdrag - Head Trip in Every Key - 1998
There’s two sad things here: one, younger kids today have never heard of (or heard) Superdrag, and two, even if you are aware of them (from their 1996 radio hit "Sucked Out", probably), chances are you may have never heard anything from this record, or subsequent records either. It’s a real shame, because Superdrag is a damn fine band!
Why didn’t you hear anything from this record? I have no idea. A band that leaned towards a retro sound didn’t fit in amongst bands like, you know, CREED. Why listen to something good when you can listen to “My Own Prison” a million times?
(To be fair, while I don’t like Creed, I can appreciate the fact that some people do.)
Anyway. This record is amazing. They took all the money their record company would give them and decided to make a very Beatles-esque record, which wasn’t a very popular idea at the time. And while the record was a flop and Elektra Records would eventually drop the band, we’re all the better for John Davis and company giving us these 13 fantastic songs.
Art note: I’m pretty happy with the pencil shading on her face… I like how the face is rendered by the rest of her is pretty stark. 
Favorite track: Shuck & Jive… but I can’t find a good link for you, so here’s my second favorite track, Sold You An Alibi

A staple in my favorite albums of all-time. Every listen brings a greater appreciation for it. Just perfect in every way. Love this drawing and write up!

justinpeterson:

INKtober day 20! My theme: drawing the covers of my favorite records… today, a power-pop masterpiece:

Superdrag - Head Trip in Every Key - 1998

There’s two sad things here: one, younger kids today have never heard of (or heard) Superdrag, and two, even if you are aware of them (from their 1996 radio hit "Sucked Out", probably), chances are you may have never heard anything from this record, or subsequent records either. It’s a real shame, because Superdrag is a damn fine band!

Why didn’t you hear anything from this record? I have no idea. A band that leaned towards a retro sound didn’t fit in amongst bands like, you know, CREED. Why listen to something good when you can listen to “My Own Prison” a million times?

(To be fair, while I don’t like Creed, I can appreciate the fact that some people do.)

Anyway. This record is amazing. They took all the money their record company would give them and decided to make a very Beatles-esque record, which wasn’t a very popular idea at the time. And while the record was a flop and Elektra Records would eventually drop the band, we’re all the better for John Davis and company giving us these 13 fantastic songs.

Art note: I’m pretty happy with the pencil shading on her face… I like how the face is rendered by the rest of her is pretty stark. 

Favorite track: Shuck & Jive… but I can’t find a good link for you, so here’s my second favorite track, Sold You An Alibi

A staple in my favorite albums of all-time. Every listen brings a greater appreciation for it. Just perfect in every way. Love this drawing and write up!

# Superdrag# head trip in every key# 1998# John Davis# art# cartoon

A good backbeat is the foundation of rock & roll— and a good, solid, swinging backbeat makes you feel great.
"She Loves You" is the best example of Ringo’s impeccable, soul-stirring, big-beat backbeat. Other Beatles numbers move like that, but "She Loves You" has such exuberance.
There’s also a lot of subtlety to what Ringo did. On “I Want To Hold Your Hand,” the verses have the patented sound of his “sloshy” hi-hat, with its cymbals open just enough to get that sizzle. Then, for the bridge, he closes it; you hear it on the quarter notes, really solid. Even casual listeners notice it, though they may not understand why or how Ringo’s doing it. But clearly, it makes such a difference to the landscape of that song!
And I love his playing on “Only A Northern Song”— those great, fall-down-the-stairs drum fills that are his trademark. Ringo’s really a lefty playing a righty kit, which is why a lot of his fills sound so unorthodox. But they’re so effective and such a part of his personality.
One of Ringo’s greatest gifts is that he helped aspiring drummers learn how to play a song. You realized that your job is to set up a chorus, stay out of the vocalist’s way, and leave space for the other musicians— the bass player in particular. Doing what’s right for the tune and moving it along to the different areas where it needs to go, locking with Paul, fueling how the whole band grooves together: That’s Ringo. And that’s so magical.
—Dennis Diken

A-fucking-men!

A good backbeat is the foundation of rock & roll— and a good, solid, swinging backbeat makes you feel great.

"She Loves You" is the best example of Ringo’s impeccable, soul-stirring, big-beat backbeat. Other Beatles numbers move like that, but "She Loves You" has such exuberance.

There’s also a lot of subtlety to what Ringo did. On “I Want To Hold Your Hand,” the verses have the patented sound of his “sloshy” hi-hat, with its cymbals open just enough to get that sizzle. Then, for the bridge, he closes it; you hear it on the quarter notes, really solid. Even casual listeners notice it, though they may not understand why or how Ringo’s doing it. But clearly, it makes such a difference to the landscape of that song!

And I love his playing on “Only A Northern Song”— those great, fall-down-the-stairs drum fills that are his trademark. Ringo’s really a lefty playing a righty kit, which is why a lot of his fills sound so unorthodox. But they’re so effective and such a part of his personality.

One of Ringo’s greatest gifts is that he helped aspiring drummers learn how to play a song. You realized that your job is to set up a chorus, stay out of the vocalist’s way, and leave space for the other musicians— the bass player in particular. Doing what’s right for the tune and moving it along to the different areas where it needs to go, locking with Paul, fueling how the whole band grooves together: That’s Ringo. And that’s so magical.

—Dennis Diken

A-fucking-men!

(via go-tothe-window)

# The Beatles# Ringo Starr# Ludwig# drummer# photography# 1964# A Hard Day's Night# quote# Dennis Diken
SPLHCB

SPLHCB

(Source: jgdlewis.com)

# The Beatles# Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band# 1967
design-is-fine:

Ellsworth Kelly, Blue and Green over Orange, 1964-65. Color lithograph on paper. Private collection, New York

design-is-fine:

Ellsworth Kelly, Blue and Green over Orange, 1964-65. Color lithograph on paper. Private collection, New York

(Source: bu.edu)

# Ellsworth Kelly# art# abstract expressionism
kwamekwanzaa:

Kanye West “Runaway” x Kwamekwanzaa

I always relate to the “Runaway” short film so much. In college, I always went to the dance company’s recitals because something about seeing beautiful girls that I knew doing ballet just did a number on my emotions and it inspired me so much.

kwamekwanzaa:

Kanye West “Runaway” x Kwamekwanzaa

I always relate to the “Runaway” short film so much. In college, I always went to the dance company’s recitals because something about seeing beautiful girls that I knew doing ballet just did a number on my emotions and it inspired me so much.

(Source: , via kanyedaily)

# Kanye West# Runaway# MY BEAUTIFUL DARK TWISTED FANTASY# art
retroreverbs:

Andrew Sedgley - Yellow Attenuation (1965).

retroreverbs:

Andrew Sedgley - Yellow Attenuation (1965).

# Andrew Sedgley# art# abstract expressionism

(Source: swoon-baby, via itsadadworld)

# Babe# booty
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